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Privacy & Security USA > How We Protect You > Equifax Cyber Incident Information

Equifax Cyber Incident Information

Equifax Cyber Incident Information

At RBC, safeguarding and protecting our clients’ information and privacy is among our highest priorities. As we learn more about the cybersecurity incident at Equifax, this page will serve as a helpful resource for clients for protecting their information and safeguarding their accounts.

What information was impacted?

According to Equifax, the cyber incident involves potential access to information that may include name, address, Social Security Number (United States), Social Insurance Number (Canada) and, in limited cases, credit card numbers. Equifax determined that approximately 145.5 million U.S. consumers were potentially impacted. Credit card numbers for approximately 209,000 U.S. consumers and certain dispute documents with personal identifying information for approximately 182,000 U.S. consumers were accessed. Finally, the personal information of approximately 8,000 Canadian consumers was also accessed.

For more information and resources, please consult the following websites:

How do I know if I have been impacted?

Equifax will send direct mail notices to consumers whose credit card numbers or dispute documents with personal identifying information were impacted.

Meanwhile, Equifax has created this website, and clients who have a Social Security Number (SSN) can check this site for more information. Equifax is offering free identity theft and credit file monitoring to these customers.

I am an RBC Bank client in the U.S. but I only have a Social Insurance Number. How do I find out if my information was exposed?

While you will be unable to enroll online for Equifax and Transunion’s services, Equifax and Transunion have advised that you may reach them by phone to speak with a customer service representative who can support you.

  • Equifax: 470-373-1187
  • Transunion: 1-800-916-8800

I received a letter from Equifax. What do I do now?

If you were notified by Equifax via mail of a potential breach, please follow the instructions outlined in that communication.

If you did not, but believe you are the victim of suspicious activity, here is what you can do:

  • Act quickly and immediately notify us of any suspicious activity or unauthorized transactions and we will investigate accordingly
  • Place a fraud alert with the credit reporting bureaus to ensure that any company who checks your credit knows your information may have been compromised and that they should contact you by phone before authorizing new credit
  • Consider filing a report with the police immediately; ask for a copy so that you can provide the evidence to the various companies you have to contact
  • Contact all creditors you deal with and review your financial information
  • Call (877) IDTHEFT (438-4338) and obtain a copy of “Taking Charge: Fighting Back Against Identity Theft” from the US Federal Trade Commission
  • For information about what to do if your Social Security Card or number is stolen, visit www.ssa.gov and type “identity theft” in the search field or call (800) 772-1213
  • Request a fraud alert be placed on your file. To do this you’ll need to contact all of the U.S. bureaus. A fraud alert will inform you if anyone requests your credit information from that bureau. It’s free and is good for 90 days.
    • Equifax: 1-888-766-0008
    • TransUnion: 1-800-680-7289
    • Experian: 1-888-397-3742
    • Innovis: 1-800-540-2505

Was my information exposed if I don’t have a U.S. product or I haven’t applied for a U.S. product?

According to Equifax, the cyber incident involves potential access to information that may include name, address, Social Security Number (United States), Social Insurance Number (Canada) and, in limited cases, credit card numbers. Equifax believes that credit card numbers for approximately 209,000 U.S. consumers; certain dispute documents with personal identifying information for approximately 182,000 U.S. consumers; and the personal information of approximately 8,000 Canadian consumers were accessed.

How else can I protect myself?

We encourage clients to monitor their account statements daily using Online Banking to protect their personal information and to ensure they are aware of all transactions on their account(s).

There are extra steps clients can take to protect their information, money & identity:

  • Be alert for “official-looking” emails or texts. Equifax will send official notifications to impacted clients by mail. RBC will never send unsolicited e-mail or text messages with links or phone numbers asking you to update or verify your account details or other personal information. Pay close attention to these communications as scam emails often contain typos and other errors. If you aren’t sure about an email or text message, call us or the company it claims to represent. Do not respond to text messages from numbers you do not recognize.
  • Change your passwords often and never use the same password for multiple accounts that contain your personal and/or sensitive information. Make sure to use a unique password — ideally a long phrase that only you would know — for each of your online accounts.
  • Request copies of your credit reports. You are entitled to order a free copy of your credit report from each of the major credit reporting agencies every 12 months through AnnualCreditReport.com.
  • Make sure websites asking for personal information are secure. A secure site has “https” at the beginning of the website’s address (“s” indicates secure).
  • Ask your financial institutions about additional security measures for your accounts. For example, fraud alerts or code words can be placed on some types of accounts for additional protection. In many cases, you can also enable text and email alerts – especially for debit and credit cards – that will potentially notify you of any suspicious activity.
  • File your taxes early. Sometimes, identity thieves use Social Security numbers to get a tax refund or obtain a job. File as soon as you have all the information you need – before an identity thief has an opportunity to file in your name – and be sure to respond to any letters from the IRS. Also consider creating an account with IRS.gov to prevent identity thieves from creating one in your name and stealing your personal information and tax data.

If, at any time, you detect any suspicious or unauthorized activity on your accounts, please contact us by calling, reaching us online or visiting us at your local branch.

  • RBC Bank (Georgia), N.A.: 1-800-769-2553.

I’ve been reading a lot about putting a credit freeze on my account? What is this and how do I go about doing that?

A credit freeze restricts access to your credit report so no one can open a new credit account in your name. When you freeze your credit, you’ll receive a unique PIN from each agency that only you’ll know and have access to. Make sure to keep each unique PIN in a safe place where only you can access it.

If you wish to freeze your credit, you’ll need to contact all of the major credit reporting agencies: Experian, TransUnion, Equifax and Innovis. Some fees may apply. If you have a U.S. Social Security Number (SSN), you may freeze your credit at TransUnion (1-888-909-8872), Equifax (1-800-685-1111 or 1-800-349-9960 for NY residents), Experian (1-888-EXPERIAN, press 2, then follow the prompts) and Innovis (1-800-540-2505).