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Aboriginal Success Stories Highlight Impact of Youth on Community and Businesses in RBC’s A Chosen Journey Report

Joel Beadle, a grade 5/6 teacher at Waninitawangaang Memorial School in Lac Seul First Nation, builds martin boxes with his students.
Joel Beadle, a grade 5/6 teacher at Waninitawangaang Memorial School in Lac Seul First Nation, builds martin boxes with his students.

TORONTO, June 21, 2017 - Across the country, young Indigenous leaders are making a positive impact in their communities and businesses, as shown by the success stories featured in the latest edition of A Chosen Journey: RBC Aboriginal Partnership Report.

 
In.Business students gather with their Indigenous business mentor at the November 2015 opening conference held in Membertou, Nova Scotia.

In.Business students gather with their Indigenous business mentor at the November 2015 opening conference held in Membertou, Nova Scotia.

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First published by RBC in 2008, A Chosen Journey has been issued annually to highlight the many successful collaborations that continue to grow between Aboriginal peoples and RBC.

“In our role as a community partner, we witness firsthand the exciting opportunities for Aboriginal people today and we recognize the tremendous work they are doing in their communities and businesses,” noted Kirk Dudtschak, Executive Vice-President, Personal and Commercial Banking at RBC. “It’s especially inspiring to see how younger people are taking the lead and contributing to the economic and social fabric of our country.

This report displays just a small collection of these successes and is a testament to the strength and hope we’ve seen in Aboriginal clients and their communities.”

 
Elaine Lickers, RBC Manager (left) and Tracy Hill (right)

Elaine Lickers, RBC Manager (left) and Tracy Hill (right)

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The 2017 edition contains a wide range of stories about people, communities and businesses, including: how the Joint Economic Development Initiative has helped facilitate Aboriginal involvement in New Brunswick’s economy; how Teach for Canada works with Northern Ontario First Nations to recruit, prepare and support teachers; and how the Flying Dust First Nation in Saskatchewan erected the first Lodge built exclusively for First Nations seniors to enable them to live independently.

Passion and pride are evident in the stories featured within A Chosen Journey – a few examples of how RBC has collaborated with communities follows below.

  • Joe Shannon, Chair of the Cape Breton University (CBU) Shannon School of Business, shares why more and more Aboriginal leaders are calling for business graduates and how RBC’s support is helping CBU coordinate mentorship to aboriginal youth and entrepreneurs so communities achieve financial independence, prosperity and empowerment for generations to come.

“Supporting Canada’s Aboriginal youth in their pursuit of business education is critical to ensuring self-reliance for First Nation communities as well as a sustainable workforce for the future.”

  • Mike Caverly, RBC Senior Commercial Account Manager, highlights how he and his colleagues collaborated with Kettle and Stoney Point First Nation to deliver, at their request, financial education to support Indigenous wealth creation and ensure money received from a recent settlement has lasting impact in the community.

“From listening to our First Nation neighbours, I have come to appreciate the absolute importance they place on improved financial literacy as fundamental to their community’s long-term success. They actively look for partners who are passionate about transferring their financial know-how, but in a way that best meets that First Nation’s unique needs.”

  • Francine Dyksterhuis, RBC Regional President, joined in celebrating the 25th anniversary and success of RBC’s Ohsweken branch in South Western Ontario – Canada’s first chartered bank to be established on First Nation Reserve.

“Having the branch on the First Nation ensures economic development. The money stays in the community and it circulates within the community, helping to generate its own wealth.” Francine Dyksterhuis, RBC Regional President.

The complete set of success stories can be found by clicking on A Chosen Journey: RBC Aboriginal Partnership Report at rbc.com/chosenjourney.

About RBC Aboriginal Banking
For more than 100 years, RBC has been building strong relationships with First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities across Canada. We are committed to serving Aboriginal governments, communities, organizations, businesses and individuals by creating opportunities for sustainable economic development through access to banking and capital, community and social development, employment, education and training and procurement. RBC also provides donations and grants that support Aboriginal interests in three key areas: youth literacy and education; the environment, specifically water; and culture and heritage. More information is available at rbcroyalbank.com/aboriginal.

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Media contact:
Rob Merk, RBC Corporate Communications, 416-955-6665