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RBC Canadian Painting Competition

Since 1999, the RBC Canadian Painting Competition, with the support of the Canadian Art Foundation, has been a unique initiative that helps bridge the gap from emerging to established artists. The RBC Canadian Painting Competition is RBC’s cornerstone RBC Emerging Artists Project property which focuses on supporting artists at the early stage of their careers. More than just financial support, this program offers mentorship, exposure to audiences and more.

Three regional juries comprised of experienced gallery directors, artists, curators and industry leaders select five paintings from their regions to make up the fifteen finalists, ensuring a true representation of visual artists from across the country.

Eastern Canada (Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, PEI, Newfoundland and Labrador),
Central Canada (Ontario),
Western Canada (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut).

The three juries convene for a two day deliberation where they determine one national winner and two honourable mentions from the 15 finalists. The national winner receives a purchase prize of $25,000, the two honourable mentions each receive $15,000 and the remaining 12 finalists receive $2,500 each.

The top three works become part of the RBC Corporate Art Collection which holds more than 4,500 works of art collected over the past century.

 

 

2018 RBC Canadian Painting Competition Now Closed

The 2018 RBC Canadian Painting Competition "call for submissions" is now closed. To all the artists who submitted their work, thank you for your interest, passion and creativity. The 15 finalists will be announced late June and the winners September 18, 2018 at The Power Plant in Toronto, Ontario.

 

 

View the finalists and previous winners:

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Amanda Boulos

Amanda Boulos
In the Morning, 2017
Oil on panel,
42 x 40 inches

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Keiran Brennan Hinton

Keiran Brennan Hinton
Hotel Room, 2018
Oil on canvas
58 x 50 inches

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Krystle Coughlin

Krystle Coughlin
Untitled, 2017
Acrylic on canvas
40 x 30 inches

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Sarah Davidson

Sarah Davidson
the garden at night, 2018
Watercolour, ink, Flashe, and pencil crayon on paper
72 x 53 inches

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Angela Fermor

Angela Fermor
Portrait 7, Torso, 2018
Oil on panel,
18 x 14 inches

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Karine Fréchette

Karine Fréchette
Croissance 1, 2018
Acrylic on canvas,
55 x 48 inches

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Stephanie Hier

Stephanie Hier
Walnuts and pears you plant for your heirs, 2017
Oil on canvas with glazed stoneware frame,
13 x 10 inches

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Ally McIntyre

Ally McIntyre
Coyote, 2017
Acrylic paint and spray paint on untreated canvas,
65 x 47 inches

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Emmanuel Osahor

Emmanuel Osahor
Hiding Place, 2018
Oil on paper, mounted on board,
41 x 51 inches

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Lauren Pelc-McArthur

Lauren Pelc-McArthur
Trop Trop, 2018
Acrylic on canvas,
24 x 18 inches

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geetha thurairajah

geetha thurairajah
A complicated relationship with our past makes for better stories of a future, 2018
Acrylic, oil and charcoal on canvas,
48 x 36 inches

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Kizi Spielmann Rose

Kizi Spielmann Rose
Swallowtail, 2018
Oil pastel and oil stick on panel,
20 x 16 inches

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Joani Tremblay

Joani Tremblay
The Mind at Three Miles an Hour, 2018
Oil on linen,
36 x 32 inches

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Tristan Unrau

Tristan Unrau
Doggy Dog Afternoon, 2018
Oil on Canvas
68 x 76 inches

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Joy Wong

Joy Wong
Cotton and Cheese 1, 2018
Oil on rubber latex,
37 x 17 inches

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You are on: Winners 2016

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Brian Hunter

National Winner

Brian Hunter
Winnipeg, MB
Two empty trays mounted vertically, 2015
Oil on wood
36 x 48 inches

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Nika Fontaine

Honourable Mention

Nika Fontaine
Berlin, DE
Schnell Schnell 17, 2015
Glitter on canvas
60 x 48 inches

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Cameron Forbes

Honourable Mention

Cameron Forbes
Saskatoon, SK
Maritime Plaza Hotel, Window Set 2, 2016
Acrylic on board
14 x 19 inches

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You are on: Winners 2017

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Ambera Wellmann

National Winner

Ambera Wellmann
Temper Ripened, 2017
Oil on wood
39 x 35 inches

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Teto Elsiddique

Honourable Mention

Teto Elsiddique
neckrings, a breezy thing, 2017
Acrylic on canvas
60 x 48 inches

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Veronika Pausova

Honourable Mention

Veronika Pausova
Typography, 2017
Oil on canvas
20 x 18 inches

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You are on: Winners 2015

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Patrick Cruz

National Winner

Patrick Cruz
Guelph (Ontario)
Time allergy, 2015
Acrylic on canvas
20 x 24 inches

Hangama Amiri

Honourable Mention

Hangama Amiri
Halifax, NS
Island of Dreams, 2015
Ink, acrylic, silkscreen on panel
36 x 36 inches

Claire Scherzinger

Honourable Mention

Claire Scherzinger
Toronto (Ontario)
My Contribution To The Many Paintings Of Pots And Plants, 2015
Graphite liquid and powdered, oil paint and linen on panel
24 x 18 inches

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Tiziana La Melia

National Winner

Tiziana La Melia
Vancouver, BC
Hanging on to the part, 2014
Oil on panel
42 x 25 inches

Nicolas Lachance

Honourable Mention

Nicolas Lachance
Montreal, QC
index no. 3 The book of Empathy, 2014
Gesso and acrylic on canvas on MDF
28 x 24 inches

Ufuk Gueray

Honourable Mention

Ufuk Gueray
Winnipeg, MB
Market, 2014
Oil and acrylic on canvas
68 x 54 inches

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You are on: Winners 2013

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Colleen Heslin

National Winner

Colleen Heslin
Vancouver, BC
Almost young, wild and free, 2013
Ink, dye and acrylic on cotton
72 x 48 inches

Colin Muir Dorward

Honourable Mention

Colin Muir Dorward
Ottawa, ON
Labyrinthineon, 2012
Oil on canvas
63 x 55 inches

Neil Harrison

Honourable Mention

Neil Harrison
Toronto, ON
Fig.13 Knowledge, 2013
Oil on linen
70 x 48 inches

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Amanda Boulos
Amanda Boulos

Amanda Boulos


Metamorphosis, death, transformation and oral histories bloom complexly in the art of Amanda Boulos. Based in Toronto and a 2017 graduate of the University of Guelph MFA program, Boulos uses the process of painting to rework her Palestinian ancestors’ stories, and create new ones. “My most recent body of work, In Memory of Mabid, originates from inherited family oral narratives of escaping danger during the Lebanese Civil War and the 1948 war in Palestine,” Boulos writes. “I reconstruct and reframe the fictionalized story of Mabid—a boy who was unjustly killed by rebels during the Lebanese Civil War—to create a visual archive that attempts to reimagine death as a moment of both rupture and renewal.” Boulos’s paintings in this series re-envision histories, rendering them more pliable, plural and plastic. “Using the slow process of painting,” says Boulos, “I can speak with my ancestors’ narratives and knowledge to create new narratives that interrupt the oppressive identity formations that continue to haunt Palestinians today.” www.amandaboulos.com (opens new window)
Keiran Brennan Hinton
Keiran Brennan Hinton

Keiran Brennan Hinton


The objects and spaces of daily life find a new, and often vibrant, home in the canvases of Keiran Brennan Hinton. Based in the Bronx and a 2016 MFA graduate of Yale University, Brennan Hinton is compelled to explore the private places where we seek out both rest and stimulation—places that could perhaps include the visual space of a picture plane, too. “In a way that a finger leaves a trace of itself on all that it touches, objects and spaces of our daily life are documents, acknowledgements and proofs of being alive,” Brennan Hinton writes. “I construct these spaces by collaging memory, observational painting and art historical references on top of each other in an attempt to suggest a quiet narrative or subdued anecdote about the unspoken weight of interior domestic space.” The artist is also a strong believer in the painting medium itself, particularly in his chosen project: “Painting,” he states, “allows one to tread water in this intimate dimension of inanimate objects.” www.keiranbrennanhinton.com (opens new window)
Krystle Coughlin
Krystle Coughlin

Krystle Coughlin


Contemporary issues of identity, belonging, land and experience surface repeatedly in the works of Selkirk First Nation artist Krystle Coughlin. Based in New Westminster and a 2018 graduate of the Simon Fraser University MFA program, Coughlin makes art that extends into photography and textiles as well as painting. “My work combines my interest in hybrid identity politics, Indigenous feminisms, and my own lived experiences,” Coughlin writes. “My practice pushes the boundaries of First Nations aesthetics, while challenging boundaries through the medium of paint.” In one painting, for instance, Coughlin creates designs inspired by traditional Northwest First Nations carvings, prompting reflection about how certain forms of First Nations art are reproduced and canonized, while others are not. Another painting of Coughlin’s is more colourful, combining different forms—from graffiti to architecture to sculpture—on canvas. This approach juxtaposes different approaches to First Nations art without pushing any particular genre to foreground or background, a gesture that pivots from values to visuals and back again.
e-mail krystle.a.coughlin@gmail.com
Sarah Davidson
Sarah Davidson

Sarah Davidson


Fragments of bodies, organisms and non-human entities evolve together, with various symbolic consequences, in the paintings of Sarah Davidson. Davidson is based in Guelph and will receive an MFA from the University of Guelph in 2019. While the shapes and forms in her work draw upon the biological, her art is also informed by research into the linked histories of science, painting and gender. “I’m interested in how painting overlaps with other mediums and modes of thinking,” Davidson writes. She quotes scientific diagrams and medieval textiles in her work, and she applies many types of media, including ink, Flashe, pencil crayon and watercolour—media that mirror those used by early botanical illustrators. Oscillating relationships between foreground and background recall strategies of species camouflage, as well as the fact that vision is more variable than many think. “As an artist,” Davidson says, “I think my interests often align with those of other practitioners interested in thinking critically about our relationship to the ‘natural world.’” www.sarahdavidson.ca (opens new window)
Angela Fermor
Angela Fermor

Angela Fermor


The challenge of picturing queer identity—particularly one’s own—is mirrored in recent paintings by Angela Fermor. Based in Calgary, and holding a 2016 BFA from the Alberta College of Art and Design, Fermor has of late focused on creating a series of self-portraits exploring queerness. “I need to describe not the one-dimensional, societal conclusions of queer people, but rather the lack of knowing that I myself experience with it that queer feeling of questioning and never really knowing,” Fermor writes. Interestingly, the artist—who in the past was critical of representational art—has chosen a realist painting style to approach this shifting subject. “I believe I cannot critique the representations of queerness through the image of a body until I’ve actually done so myself,” they say. In this way, Fermor’s painting represents an attempt to contest the power of realist approaches while also learning how to master them—a method that, like the artist using it, keeps changing in tension with what is possible. www.angelafermor.com (opens new window)
Karine Fréchette
Karine Fréchette

Karine Fréchette


Experimental measurement tools, abstract painting traditions and contemporary psychedelic aesthetics radiate through the works of Karine Fréchette. Based in Montreal and a 2017 graduate of the Concordia University MFA program, Fréchette makes paintings evoking waves and oscillations. She’s compelled by the fact that light can operate as both wave and particle, as both energy and material, in both space and time. Research showing that both space and time can be warped is another topic of interest, one with consequences for the stability of human vision itself: “In my paintings,” Fréchette writes, “the alteration of perception is itself a subject.” While Fréchette has of late investigated sunlight and other natural waveforms, she notes that the electric hues and moire effects of her canvases conjure contemporary, human-made phenomena like the screen—and its attendant climates of Wi-Fi clouds and cellular waves. Melding optical, spatial and material experience, as well as scientific and (for some) spiritual imagery, Frechette’s paintings chart fluctuations between many aspects of life in 2018. e-mail karinefrechette@hotmail.fr
Stephanie Hier
Stephanie Hier

Stephanie Hier


A witty mix of high realism and pop symbology, along with a dose of craft culture, converge in the art of Stephanie Hier. A 2014 BFA graduate of OCAD University, the Brooklyn-based Hier creates canvases melding images and techniques across centuries of Western cultural production—from old masters like Rembrandt and Chardin to new masters like Facebook and Disney. “I’m interested in how painting fits into a larger network,” Hier writes. “As nothing exists in isolation, so painting is connected to its past as well as all images in the world, codified and flattened by the Internet.” The dispersed webs of imagery floating across Hier’s canvases are brought down to earth, somewhat, by ceramic and wooden frames she hand-makes for her paintings. “These frames act as sculptural elements which reaffirm painting’s place in the three-dimensional world,” she states. Combining traditional materials like hand-dyed linen with imagery from cartoons and clip art, Hier (and her viewers) traverse wide spans of art history—and art’s many contexts—in a single painting. www.stephaniehier.com (opens new window)
Ally McIntyre
Ally McIntyre

Ally McIntyre


Growth, change and deconstruction are some of the concepts cultivated in the paintings of Ally McIntyre. Based in Edmonton and a 2015 graduate of the Goldsmiths MFA program, McIntyre has focused in recent canvases on depicting plants through an array of visual styles—including “faux-naive, realism, kitsch, expressionism and cartoon.” McIntyre’s mix of styles and mediums underlines her desire to critique “hierarchy in culture, art and human-animal relations.” Through these processes and themes, McIntyre has nurtured a series of paintings that speak to both biological and spiritual adaptation: “The body of work that succeeded,” she writes, “is about how all things grow–examining the strength that lies in resiliency and determination.” Further, “In these works, my process mimics the experience of growth, by responding and adapting to the marks that are laid down and which challenge its assumed path.” www.allymcintyre.com (opens new window)
Emmanuel Osahor
Emmanuel Osahor

Emmanuel Osahor


Sanctuary and survival, migration and permanence, ideal and reality: these are some of the narratives that journey together in the paintings of Emmanuel Osahor. Based in Edmonton and a 2014 BFA graduate of the University of Alberta, Osahor’s art reflects on questions like, “Why and in what ways do we create individual oases of hope in our societies?” Osahor’s practice is also informed by his experience migrating from Nigeria to Canada: “I [initially] put Canada on a pedestal, since it was labelled ‘developed’ while Nigeria was labelled ‘developing,’” he writes. “I expected a utopia. But I’ve come to understand that, even as utopic visions of development are created and pursued across the world, many times, for marginalized communities, basic human needs like shelter, food and healthcare are neglected.” While landscape painting has a long tradition in Canada, Osahor’s views of Edmonton parks bring a vital, contemporary awareness to landscape—and the solace it can provide—as something constructed, complicated and political, rather than simple, pure or natural. www.eosahorart.com (opens new window)
Lauren Pelc-McArthur
Lauren Pelc-McArthur

Lauren Pelc-McArthur


Multiplicity, femininity, decoration and overload are motifs that illuminate the paintings of Lauren Pelc-McArthur. Based in Montreal and due to receive an MFA from Concordia University in 2019, Pelc-McArthur focuses her practice on “forces that conflict, expressed through many painting styles that coexist on a single canvas.” This conflict echoes contemporary clashes in the wider cultural and visual sphere, with Pelc-McArthur’s high-intensity colour palette borrowed in part from the hues of backlit LCD screens. “These colours both entice and repel,” Pelc-McArthur writes, “much like the feelings of captivation and disinterest born from staring at a bright screen with thousands of images scrolling past.” Interestingly, unlike our smooth-to-touch screens, McArthur’s paintings have a great deal of texture, which underlines their analog, one-of-a-kind and handmade quality. References to ornament, vegetation and the body can also be read into these works. In the age of the infinite scroll, these are not easy images to swipe away from. www.laurenpelcmcarthur.com (opens new window)
geetha thurairajah
geetha thurairajah

geetha thurairajah


Images don’t have to work the way they always have—and it’s worth asking whom they were made to work for in the first place. These are two of the potent critiques that find form in geetha thurairajah’s paintings. Based in Brooklyn, the artist is a 2014 BFA graduate of NSCAD University. thurairajah integrates genres like airbrush, collage and traditional painting into shape-shifting compositions that, as she puts it, “use the possibilities of paint to deconstruct the codes of authority over an image.” In some of her paintings, shadows cast out in unexpected directions from their figures; in others, solid ground and airy space unite. Appropriation, anachronism and abstraction are some of the techniques thurairajah uses to disrupt visual hierarchies. “As we become more available to purely visual information, how do our perceptions of the world change?” thurairajah asks. “Who is dis/empowered by these encoded systems of visual communication?” By bending typical expectations of painted images, thurairajah’s canvases help viewers see some of the biases inherent in Western art traditions. www.geetha.ca (opens new window)
Kizi Spielmann Rose
Kizi Spielmann Rose

Kizi Spielmann Rose


Process, craft and optical intensity are all well-etched into the work of Kizi Spielmann Rose. Based in Wolfville and a 2017 graduate of the University of Ottawa’s MFA program, Spielmann Rose is interested in how painting can stimulate new views of the world beyond the frame. “The virtue of painting,” the artist writes, “is to focus the act of looking so that one turns away from a painting with fresh attentiveness to what can be seen.” Working in the medium of oil pastel and oil stick on panel, Spielmann Rose subscribes to an open-ended method that emphasizes improvisation. “I am motivated by the task of tinkering with a painting,” he explains, “so that it steadily gains energy through confounding spatial arrangements, vibratory interactions of colour, and interweaving of forms.” This practice results in paintings that conjure a variety of influences—baroque exuberance, art deco ornamentation, biomorphic abstraction and geographic map-making among them. www.kizispielmannrose.com (opens new window)
Joani Tremblay
Joani Tremblay

Joani Tremblay


Mappings between the abstract and the representational, the virtual and the physical, and the utopian and the real generate a compelling tension in the artworks of Joani Tremblay. Based in Montreal, and a 2017 MFA graduate of Concordia University, Tremblay, in her own words, “investigates the relationship between landscape, its simulations and reproductions, and how it is combined with our own memory of places.” It’s a salient topic in an age when nature is pictured in everything from films and photographs to theme park attractions, computer games and advertisements, from pages to screens to physical spaces and back again. This sense of multiple—and yet simultaneously layered—experiences of landscape influences her art, too. “The back and forth between representation and abstraction hopefully creates a new space we can go into and reflect, a new psychological landscape of a sort,” Tremblay writes. The artist further emphasizes a sensitivity toward space and place by installing sculptures, as well as paintings, in her solo exhibitions. www.joanitremblay.com (opens new window)
Tristan Unrau
Tristan Unrau

Tristan Unrau


Variety, excess and the history of what is commonly called “painting from life” are themes that germinate in the canvases of Tristan Unrau. Based in Los Angeles, and a 2017 MFA graduate of UCLA, Unrau approaches painting as a practice open to many voices and approaches—even from a single artist. “A painting contains its own style, but why should the painter?” Unrau writes. “Painting isn’t just about painting anymore; painting is a way of thinking. To paint is a kind of telling and you can do all sorts of things with that.” One of the things Unrau does with painting is start with precedents from the canon and let his own images grow from that—even “grow out of hand,” he says. From the leafy vegetation that fills some of his canvases to the louche, strange animals at the centre of other compositions, Unrau hits on a contemporary uncanny that still has much to say about the past, in art or otherwise. www.tristanunrau.com (opens new window)
Joy Wong
Joy Wong

Joy Wong


Material experimentation, visceral experience and sculptural extension are all elements that fold together in the recent art of Joy Wong. Based in the Toronto area, and a 2018 MFA graduate of Western University, Wong has of late focused on working with bits of poured, dried paint, peeling them from their initial supports and reworking them until they speak of skins, borders and notions of the self. Her use of rubber latex, rather than canvas, as a painted material underlines this effect. “I am interested in the metaphors of skin as boundaries and mediators between the self and the world,” Wong writes, “and with these skins I also investigate the intersections of disgust and attraction.” This sense of the corporeal or physical—as well as the wear of time on the body—is enhanced by the way Wong arranges her paintings into a kind of soft sculpture, then nails or staples them directly into the wall. “Each new hole or tear,” Wong says, “is considered part of the painting.” www.buomhof.com (opens new window)
Ambera Wellmann

Ambera Wellmann

Ambera Wellmann graduated from the MFA program at the University of Guelph. Her work emerges from an engagement with a diverse range of nineteenth century figuration from the Western canon. She is interested in artists who conceptualized modes of realism as an engine of self-understanding and renewal during periods of rapid social and technological transformation. Exploring this tradition from a feminist perspective, her work embodies the experience of violence and eroticism that underlies realism, and critically reflects upon how those sensations are rationalized as representations of women. The translucent clay bodies that populate her paintings provide both a layered visual archaeology and a sense of continuity that engages a critical dialogue around figuration’s role in the production of gendered subjects and viewers. Through marks that seduce and simultaneously confess the procedures of their seduction, her paintings aspire to a sense of vulnerability over knowledge, and feeling over explanation. Wellmann is represented by TrépanierBaer Gallery.
Teto Elsiddique

Teto Elsiddique

Teto Elsiddique was a 2016 graduate of the MFA program in Painting and Printmaking at Yale University and received a BFA from NSCAD University. He was a finalist in the 2014 RBC Canadian Painting Competition. As a child of globalization, born in Manchester, raised in Sudan and Canada, and working in the United States, he searched for everyday objects that were both firmly positioned in the West and marked by a history that looks to the East. In constructing his paintings, he traced objects used to teach, objects that signify a performed identity or cultural growth, children’s developmental toys, model train tracks, a wedding dress, and various heirlooms. Formally, the works referenced hieroglyphs and relief carvings, and evoke the fragmentation of collage. “My work,” he wrote, “wrestles with the index of past cultural identifiers that have transgressed borders, leaving echoes in our everyday language, gestures, and material existence.” 
Veronika Pausova

Veronika Pausova

Veronika Pausova was born in Prague and lives and works in Toronto. She received her BFA from the Glasgow School of Art and her MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University. “I like to use a kind of mathematical surrealism, with some personal logic, when I make my paintings,” she writes of her work. “I’m interested in the materiality of paint and how color, texture, and pattern can be conceptual.” Rather than planning her paintings with drawing, she experiments with paint as part of the “drawing” process, experimenting with new ways of using paint – scratching, sanding, or layering mediums – and making and re-making many paintings until the right elements come together from the various discarded works. Looking constantly to her past production, she often repeats imagery, creating her own lexicon and occasionally adding new “characters” such as the spider that appears in Typography, that may morph and appear under a different guise in subsequent work.
Brian Hunter

Brian Hunter

Born in Winnipeg in 1985, Brian Hunter works in projects, sculpture and video as well as in painting. He trained at Concordia University, where he earned a BFA in 2007. For his project Support and Comfort, he painted figures on mattresses, which he then left on the street,according to ION Magazine. For his project You Know Best, he created a hut out of pink air mattresses, and installed a video within. Hunter has exhibited at Platform in Winnipeg, Dupont Projects in Toronto, Art Souterrain in Montreal and other Canadian venues, as well as at sites in South Korea, where he went for a residency in 2012 and 2013.
Nika Fontaine

Nika Fontaine

Born in Montreal in 1985, Nika Fontaine has lived and worked in Berlin since 2008. Fontaine has a diverse background, moving from fashion design and hair-styling studies in the early 2000s to painting and drawing courses at Concordia University in Montreal and Kunsthochschule Berlin in the later 2000s and early 2010s. Fontaine has a multidisciplinary practice including performances, web works and musics as well as paintings—the latter of which are often made with glitter.As reported by Germany’s dbartmag in 2014, Fontaine’s “great uncle Jean-Paul Jérôme was one of Canada’s first geometric painters and became internationally known in the mid-fifties as a member of the artists’ group Les Plasticiens. For Fontaine, the glitter so often associated with ‘queerness’ in today’s art establishment is more a formal means: ‘At first I worked with acrylic and oil, and always tried to make my colors as intense as possible. But they were never strong enough for me. With the glitter, I get this intensity of color and brilliance, and in addition an interactive aspect, because every movement on the part of the viewer changes the coloration and sense of spatial depth.'”
Cameron Forbes

Cameron Forbes

Cam Forbes, originally from Saskatchewan, is currently completing an MFA at Concordia University in Montreal. She holds a BFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, completed in 2005, and also studied at the Kootenay School of Art and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. From 2007 to 2013, she lived in Winnipeg, developing urban landscape plein air explorations and community-based art projects; while there, she was the executive director of Art City from 2008 to 2011. “Primarily, I am interested in the landscape we occupy as individuals and as communities,” Forbes says on her website. “Canada has a long tradition of landscape painting. Most people are as familiar with viewing paintings of natural landscapes as they are with seeing it with their own eyes. The relationship between these modes of being with the country—as passive and active observer—fascinate me. Landscape/plein air painting has a strong association with the past, memory and idealized beauty; uncomplicated nostalgia. However, the genre is inextricably tied to a history of exploration, exploitation, settlement and colonization. This tension informs much of my practice.”
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